Tag Archives: sculpture

Found Art Project II

Found Art Mandala

Found Art Mandala

For me, finding the ‘found objects’ is the fun part, assembling the pieces is harder.   Lynn declines the class field trip to the ‘Last Chance Mercantile’, “I have too much stuff already”.   LL. not only has a storage container, but also an airplane hangar.  Found objects have crowded me out of my studio.  It’s time to put that potential  to use.

Beverly Rayner, our instructor, is a fount of knowledge; she shares with us her years of trial and error with glues, paints, nuts, bolts, wire, welding, etc.  In a previous post I shared my project proposal.  The sticking point in the proposal was how to put together the rusted elements without changing the patina.  Steve recommends epoxy, which is what I end up using.  Epoxy comes not only in a 2 part liquid form but also in solid form which solved one of my major problems, attaching the heavy gear.

Side view

The finished found object mandala turned out very close to my original idea.  Along the way new ideas appear to create a solid and pleasing piece.  Circular shapes dominate the piece, creating a simple aesthetic.  The repetition of the circle reinforces the idea of the wholeness. Smaller pieces in the outer circle, composed of copper, verdigris, rust, nuts, gears, and natural wood, create variety and break up the monotony, while at the same time echoing the theme.

The patina of the rust was maintained and augment with a wonderful verdigris.  The color scheme is limited to natural tones set by the patinas, the rust and the copper green verdigris.  A simple wood frame supports the mandala.  The top border gives the piece a feeling of a gate.  The finished piece will be set in concrete and installed outdoors.

Mixing it Up is an art workshop with mixed media artist Beverly Rayner.

 

 

 

Found Art Project Proposal

Often it is a single object that launches a project. It may not turn out to be the focal point. It may not even end up in the finished project, but the shape, material, mood, or memory that it stirs, will set the tone of the piece. It is such with the piece this proposal covers.

Figure 1

Figure 1

The basic simplicity of the shape and the rust patina is what initially caught my eye, figure 1. These two elements will be the base of the piece, creating a simple aesthetic.

Adding like objects will reinforce the shape and patina, and help to creates unity, figure 2.

In Buddhism, the circle symbolizes enlightenment and wholeness. Looking at the objects, a mandala comes to mind. The mandala represents the universe or the self. The rust patina of the objects suggests aging. My proposal is to create a mandala representing my life as I head into old age, the natural cycle of life.

Figure 2

Figure 2

The Buddhist concept of the void fits in with the negative space in the metal frame. The gears are representative of the infinite time spectrum, time marches on. The circular shapes echo the cycle of life.

One style of mandalas consists of rings, the ‘charnel grounds’, representing dying; a reminder of the impermanence and transient nature of life. Within the rings lies the mandala palace, populated by deities and Buddhas. While not adhering to the classic mandala, I will endeavor towards these ideals.

The difficulty I foresee will be the weight of the objects. The metal frame and the gears are very heavy. I would like to make a hanging piece but the weight of the objects may be too great. Alternatively a standing piece may be a possibility.

Figure 3

Figure 3

Another challenge will be assembling the pieces. As we are dealing with metal, welding comes to mind. But the wonderful rust patina may be damaged.

There is the possibility of wire or chain to place the objects. These avenues of attachment will need to be explored.